SG:Live – Green Room

In digital media terms, a “Green Room” is a virtual waiting room for guests and performers who are not on camera.

On this webpage, I would like to share some tips and suggestions for my guests and presenters appearing on SG:Live that might help them to prepare (if needed).

On a positive note, even the most accomplished and polished presenters in the world “fluff” up.

SG Live

Prior to the Event

  • Content & Format  – Unless it’s “freestyle”, this is normally all sorted with you to make sure you are agreeable and comfortable with the flow of discussions.
  • Platform – I use a range of platforms for streaming (e.g., Zoom, Streamyard, Restream etc).  Before the event, I will send you a link that will allow you to connect with me on the scheduled day.
  • LIGHTS – CAMERA – ACTION :  When it comes to being on camera, I always think about these 3 important facets and below, I have some tips and suggestions that you might find helpful.

Lights

Such an important and overlooked aspect. Perhaps obvious, but here are top my tips:

  • If possible, use natural light. However, if you want to use other light sources, you may have to test them offline to make sure it’s the best for you.
  • Make sure the light source is directly in front of you and behind the camera. If possible, avoid overhead lights, unless you have “fill lights”.
  • If there are a lot of shadows (e.g., on the face), try using “fill lights”. The choice is yours and really depends on your skin tone, ambient lighting etc.
  • The best tip I can offer is test the light sources offline and watch the recorded clips to make sure you are happy with the output.

Camera

Again, perhaps obvious, but here are my tips:

  • Minimise using “busy backgrounds” because “YOU” are the important focal point.
  • Try an keep the colour palette simple but complementing your skin tone, clothes etc.
  • Avoid having the camera below your eyeline, what I call “nasal shots”. My optimum choice is having the camera positioned and pointing at a slight downward angle. 
  • Make sure the camera is securely mounted and vibrations minimised, especially if you are using a laptop or desktop camera.
  • Always a good idea to give a camera lens a wipe before the live session. I always find dust on my camera lens, even when covered up!
  • The best tip I can offer is play around with the camera angles and when you are really happy, make a mark or setting indicator for future reference.

Action

Now we come to the big stuff and here are some of my top tips:

  • We all make mistakes and it’s the host or moderators job to make sure the discussions flow well.
  • Minimise rapid movements and gestures because these are hugely magnified on camera.
  • With regard to audio aspects, always worth checking that you have a decent microphone. I find using a headset for live events is much better than a free standing mic…worth experimenting before the event because it can be cumbersome to wear for a long time.
  • Minimise talking over other guests. If you want to say something, I usually find a short hand movement near the face or mouth is a good indicator for others. This is why it’s important to avoid excessive body movements.
  • The best tip I can offer is relax, just be natural and yourself.